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The war in Ukraine is a conflict between two vastly unequal forces. Russia continues to drop massive bombs on Ukraine, and Ukraine cannot respond with the same ferocity. Ukraine’s air force uses bombs, but not to the extent that Russia does.

For example, Ukraine’s State Service for Emergency Situations showed a large Russian bomb that had to be removed from someone’s house. Thankfully, it didn’t explode.

It’s not that Ukraine doesn’t have bombs. Ukraine has been dropping guided-gliding JDAM-ER bombs on Russian positions whenever it gets the chance. Delivered in the first half of 2023, the US bombs have a range of 72 km. Due to the ubiquitous presence of Russian air defense systems, Ukrainian aircraft cannot fly higher than near the contact line, but successfully JDA Ames Attacks are recorded. Ukraine appears to be using its own MiG-29s for these attacks.

But Russia has a wide range of different aerial bombs to drop on Ukrainian cities and locations. Just look at what was found on February 4 in a village in Kharkiv Oblast:

Ukrainian experts came to collect an unexploded bomb from a village in Kharkiv region.Ukrainian experts came to collect an unexploded bomb from a village in Kharkiv region.

Ukrainian experts came to collect an unexploded bomb from a village in Kharkiv region. Image credit: via the State Emergency Service of Ukraine Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0)

The State Service of Ukraine for Emergencies revealed. That it could be KAB-250. To us, it looks like an OFAB-250, with that barrel feature. The KAB-250 is a guided bomb, while the OFAB-250 is older and ‘deaf

The OFAB-250 is a Russian high-explosive fragmentation bomb, designed primarily to destroy enemy troops and unarmored targets. Depending on the type, it weighs just over 260 kg and has an explosive charge of about 100 kg. The interesting feature of the OFAB-250 is that it has a sawtooth pattern on the inside – the deep grooves are meant to aid in cutting.

Whatever this bomb is, it looks rusty and old. And it was knocked down by a house in a Ukrainian village – if it had exploded, it would have blown everything to pieces.

It looks like an OFAB-250 to us.  It was disposed of on 4 February 2024.It looks like an OFAB-250 to us.  It was disposed of on 4 February 2024.

It looks like an OFAB-250 to us. It was abolished on 4 February 2024. Photo credit: State Emergency Service of Ukraine via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0)

When you see numbers in the names of Russian bombs, they always indicate weight. Russia attacks Ukraine all the time with FAB-, KAB- and OFAB-250 bombs. In fact, as Ukraine’s air defenses improve, Russia is improving its bombs so they can fly longer and the planes don’t have to come close to the battlefield.

Russia also uses 500-class (FAB/KAB/OFAB) bombs, which are obviously heavier, but are also being taught to fly with additional wings.

Many Russian bombs do not explode and have to be collected and disposed of. This may be due to their age or perhaps incorrect user technique. However, many of them explode, causing devastating damage. Gliding bombs are nearly impossible to shoot down, so the best defense is to eliminate the carrier aircraft. And this is why Ukraine needs to get new fighter jets as soon as possible.

written by Povelas M.

Sources: State Emergency Service of Ukraine, Wikipedia



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